Unit Plan: Canadian Geography

Social Studies / Grade 2

Big Ideas

Canada is made up of many diverse regions and communities.

Concepts:

  • Diversity
  • Communities
  • Climate

Essential Questions

Students will keep considering…

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

Evaluative Criteria

Teachers should consider how summative assessments should be based on clear criteria and include a variety of ways for students to show demonstrate their learning

  • Quiz on Canadian regions and where they are on a map

Monitoring Progress

Teacher will monitor progress:
Teachers can monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment including but not limited to:

  • Short, quick quizzes and review discussions on various regions in Canada
  • Short, quick quizzes and review discussion on climate areas of Canada

Resources

WEBSITES

OTHER

  • Atlas/Map of Canada
  • Photos of various regions of Canada
  • Aboriginal Success Teacher
  • Blank Maps of Canada

Reflection

Teacher Reflection

  • What aspects of the unit went well
  • What did students struggle with
  • What did you struggle with?
  • What would you add or revise the next time you taught this unit?
  • Were there any unintended outcomes?
  • Were students engaged?

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

EXECUTE THE LEARNING PLAN

LEARNING EVENTS:

  • These learning events/activities are suggested activities only. 
  • In some cases the plans are not fully completed lesson plans. 
  • The teacher may choose some lessons/activities to span over several lessons. 
  • Teachers may add, revise and adapt these lessons based on the needs of their students, their personal preferences for resources, and the use of a variety of instructional techniques.

Learning events are enriched for students when teachers consider the “WHERE TO” acronym and guiding organizer by Wiggins and McTighe.

> Click here for more information on WHERETO

 

 

Where To

Where: Where are we going in this lesson Why? What is expected of my students during and after this lesson? • Present the performance task to students early in the unit • Post essential questions; students can generate their own questions as well • Check for  misconceptions
How: How will I hook and hold student interest during this lesson? • Use a provocation as an entry point • Present students with a mystery or challenge
Equip: How will I equip students for expected performances? How will I make sure to teach the foundational skills so that they can understand and complete tasks? • Access understandings and experience with solid instructional practices • Consider strategies that work for divers e learners • Incorporate literacy 44 strategies
Rethink and Revise: How will I help students reflect, rethink and revise their ideas, writing, and tasks? • Have students rethink the big idea • Have students reflect on  their learning  to build understanding
Evaluate: How will students self-evaluate and reflect on their learning after each lesson/task? Some ideas for self-evaluation include:

• Ticket out the door • Rubrics and checklists • Formative assessments and feedback

Tailor: How will I tailor learning to varied needs, interests and styles? (refer to the NVSD Adaptations Checklist). • Differentiate to your students with the product, the process and the content
Organize:   How will I organize and sequence the learning in each lesson and transition to a new lesson? • Start with the end in mind
Please note that the order in which teachers present this to their students is not mandated to the order of the acronym.

 

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

Lesson 1 - What Would It Be Like If All of Canada Looked the Same?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

 

What Would It Be Like If All of Canada Looked the Same? (Lesson 1)

1) Show images of different places in Canada and brainstorm what they see.  Put out pictures and chart on different tables and have students move around to write what they see/think/wonder about the images.

2) Meet as a group and discuss what they saw – name the actual places/regions for the students.  Refer to a map of Canada throughout.

3) Why do you think each place is so different? (the weather, climate, the size of Canada)

4) Show this video.

5) Ask: Which place you like to live in?

Lesson 2 - Geographical Features

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

 

Geographical Features  (Lesson 2)

STATIONS –activities – map to identify the region; reading activity, listen/watch a video, paper/pencil activity, identify which aboriginal group originally came from each area (on another map)

> The Territories and Nunavut

> The Prairies (Manitoba Saskatchewan, Alberta)

> The Maritimes (Atlantic Canada)

> The West Coast (The Rainforest, Mountains)

> The Canadian Shield (Ontario and Quebec)

Check In After Stations – Thinking about the physical features of each area, which place would you like to live in and why?

Lesson 3 - What Would It Be Like If All of Canada Looked the Same?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

 

What Would It Be Like If All of Canada Looked the Same? (Lesson 3)

1) Claim Support Question (in partners): What would it be like if there were mountains/snow/prairies everywhere?

2) Group share out.

3) Each student fills out: “If all of Canada looked physically the same, then I couldn’t _________________________ because ___________________________.”

Lesson 4 - What If the Climate Was the Same Everywhere in Canada?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

 

What If the Climate Was the Same Everywhere in Canada? (Lesson 4)

1) Define Climate – the pattern of weather over a long range of time

2) Define Weather – the minute to minute changes

3) Break down the six regions:

> Territories and Nunavut – colder, snow, shorter days, longer nights, permafrost, nothing grows

> The Prairies – definite difference between winter and summer; things grow easily

> Maritimes – cold winters, hot summers (add more here)

> Shield – cold winters, hot summers (add more here)

> West Coast – milder temperatures, not much snow, lots of rain (rainforest), things grow easily

4) Students fill in lapbook template on each region, writing facts and drawing a picture for each.

5) Charades game – acting out what you would do/wear in each region

6) Thinking about the climate only…which area would you like to live in and why?

7) “If all of Canada had the same climate, then I couldn’t ______________________ because ___________________.”

Lesson 5 - What Types of Environmental Challenges Do People Face in Different Communities (e.g., Natural Disasters, Climate Change, Lack of Natural Resources)?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What would it be like if all of Canada looked the same?
  • What if the climate was same everywhere in Canada?
  • What types of environmental challenges do people face in different communities (e.g., natural disasters, climate change, lack of natural resources)?

 

What Types of Environmental Challenges Do People Face in Different Communities (e.g., Natural Disasters, Climate Change, Lack of Natural Resources)? (Lesson 5)

1. Define what an environmental challenge is – have students brainstorm together as a whole class.  Read a picture book/aboriginal story??  Concept Attainment – Have students sort cards into categories – environmental challenge, or one-time event?

2. PWIM – show a picture of Nunavut during the winter and have students generate what they see/think/feel/wonder about what they see in the image.  Lead to discussion on what challenges people may have living here year round.

3.  Repeat PWIM with an image of an image of an actual natural disaster (flood), and again with a drought, etc…

4. Connect to meeting needs and wants in different areas.  Discussion/lesson on what needs and wants are.

5. Discussion on climate then and now – show images and talk about climate change.  Have students complete a Venn diagram comparing a Canadian winter in the past and now.

4.  If I lived in an environment that had lots of _____________, (or very little __________) then I would need to think about _______________________ in order to live there.

The following resources are made available through the British Columbia Ministry of Education. For more information, please visit BC’s New Curriculum.

 

Big Ideas

The Big Ideas consist of generalizations and principles and the key concepts important in an area of learning. The Big Ideas represent what students will understand at the completion of the curriculum for their grade. They are intended to endure beyond a single grade and contribute to future understanding.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Core Competencies

orangecommunicationCommunications Competency

The set of abilities that students use to impart and exchange information, experiences and ideas, to explore the world around them, and to understand and effectively engage in the use of digital media

bluethinkingThinking Competency

The knowledge, skills and processes we associate with intellectual development

greensocialSocial Competency

The set of abilities that relate to students’ identity in the world, both as individuals and as members of their community and society


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Curricular Competencies & Content

Curricular Competencies are the skills, strategies, and processes that students develop over time. They reflect the “Do” in the Know-Do-Understand model of curriculum. The Curricular Competencies are built on the thinking, communicating, and personal and social competencies relevant to disciplines that make up an area of learning.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Additional Resources

First People's Principles of Learning

To read more about First People’s Principles of Learning, please click here.

For classroom resources, please visit the First Nations Education Steering Committee.