Unit Plan: Fractions

Math / Grade 6-7

Big Ideas

Social Studies 10

  • Worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society.

BC First Peoples 12

  • The identities, worldviews, and language of BC First Peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land.
  • The impact of contact and colonialism continues to affect the political, social, and economic lives of BC First Peoples
  • Cultural expressions convey the richness, diversity, and resiliency of BC First Peoples.

Comparative Cultures 12

  • Understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture enhances our understanding of other cultures.
  • Interactions between belief systems, social organization, and language influence artistic expressions of culture

Contemporary Indigenous Studies

  • The identities, worldviews, and language of indigenous peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through the connection to the land.
  • Indigenous peoples are reclaiming mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being despite the continuing effects of colonialism.
  • Indigenous peoples continue to advocate and assert rights to self-determination.

Comparative World Religions

  • Comparing beliefs provides insights and understanding of diverse global cultures and peoples.

Law Studies

  • Understanding legal rights and responsibilities allows citizens to participate more fully in society.
  • Laws can maintain the status quo and can also be a force for change.
  • A society’s laws and legal framework affects many aspects of people’s daily lives.

Social Justice

  • Social justice issues are interconnected.
  • Individual worldviews shape and inform the understanding of social justice issues.
  • The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society

Concepts:

  • Personal Identity
  • The factors that determine identity either personally, community, or institutionally
Essential Questions

Students will keep considering…

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?
Evaluative Criteria

N/A

Monitoring Progress

Teacher will monitor progress:
Teachers can monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment including but not limited to:

  • Class discussion
  • Group and pair discussions
Reflection

How will teachers and their students reflect on and evaluate the completed project?

Teacher Reflection

  • What aspects of the unit went well?
  • What did students struggle with?
  • What did you struggle with?
  • What would you add/revise the next time you taught this unit?
  • Were there any unintended outcomes?
  • Were students engaged?

Stage 1 – Desired Results

Big Ideas
  • Worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society. (Social Studies 10)
  • The identities, worldviews, and language of BC First Peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land. (BC First Peoples 12)
  • The impact of contact and colonialism continues to affect the political, social, and economic lives of BC First Peoples. (BC First Peoples 12)
  • Cultural expressions convey the richness, diversity, and resiliency of BC First Peoples. (BC First Peoples 12)
  • Understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture enhances our understanding of other cultures. (Comparative Cultures 12)
  • Interactions between belief systems, social organization, and language influence artistic expressions of culture. (Comparative Cultures 12)
  • The identities, worldviews, and language of indigenous peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through the connection to the land. (Contemporary Indigenous Studies)
  • Indigenous peoples are reclaiming mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being despite the continuing effects of colonialism. (Contemporary Indigenous Studies)
  • Indigenous peoples continue to advocate and assert rights to self-determination. (Contemporary Indigenous Studies)
  • Comparing beliefs provides insights and understanding of diverse global cultures and peoples. (Comparative World Religions)
  • Understanding legal rights and responsibilities allows citizens to participate more fully in society. (Law Studies)
  • Laws can maintain the status quo and can also be a force for change. (Law Studies)
  • A society’s laws and legal framework affects many aspects of people’s daily lives. (Law Studies)
  • Social justice issues are interconnected. Individual worldviews shape and inform the understanding of social justice issues. (Social Justice)
  • The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society. (Social Justice)

Concepts:

  • Personal Identity
  • The factors that determine identity either personally, community, or institutionally
Transfer Goals

Students will be able to independently use their learning to…

  • Determine how personal experience, communities and institutions such as the government shape identity through personal connections with family, community, and protocol and how institutional policies affect one’s identity on a personal, communal  and political level.
Meaning

UNIT UNDERSTANDINGS:

Students will understand that…

  • N/A

ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS:

Students will keep considering…

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

> Click here to learn more about Essential Questions

Acquisition

CURRICULAR COMPETENCIES

Students will be skilled at…

Social Studies 10

  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their significance at particular times and places, and from group to group (significance)
  • Explain and infer different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, or events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment) 
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and determine appropriate ways to remember and respond (ethical judgment)

BC First Peoples 12 

  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change)
  • Determine and assess the long- and-short term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an event, decision, or development (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical claims in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Recognize and understand that some knowledge is considered sacred and only shared with permission and/or in certain situations, with certain people (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)

 

Comparative Cultures 12  

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess and compare the significance of cultural expressions at particular times and places (historical significance)
  • Evaluate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, context, reliability, and usefulness of multiple sources from the past and present (evidence)
  • Analyze continuities and changes in diverse cultures at different times and places (continuity and change)
  • Assess the development and impact of the thought, artistic expressions, power and authority, and technological adaptations of diverse cultures (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present cultures (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)

 

Contemporary Indigenous Studies 

  • Use holistic, experiential, reflective, and relational experiences to better understand connectedness and the reciprocal relationship of First Peoples and the sense of place.
  • Recognize the consequences of our actions (cause and consequence)
  • Assess and compare the significance of the interconnections between people, places, events, and developments at a particular time and place, and determine what they reveal about issues in the past and present (significance)
  • Ask questions and corroborate inferences of Elders and other local knowledge keepers through oral traditions, indigenous knowledge, memory, history, and story (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups in different time periods and places (continuity and change)
  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences of an event, decision, or development (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of today and the past (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical claims in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Recognize and understand that some knowledge is considered sacred and only shared with permission, and/or in certain situations, with certain people (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical claims about actions in the past and present after considering the context and values of the times (ethical judgment)

Comparative World Religions

  • Explain the significance of texts, philosophies, events, or developments at particular times and places within various belief systems (significance)

Law Studies

  • Gather, interpret, and analyze legal concepts, issues, and procedures; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess and compare the significance and impact of legal systems and codes (significance)
  • Assess the justification for differing legal perspectives after investigating points of contention, reliability of sources, and adequacy of evidence (evidence)
  • Analyze continuities and changes in legal systems and thought during different time periods and across jurisdictions (continuity and change)
  • Assess the development and impact of legal systems and ideas of justice (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past or present people, places, issues, and events by considering prevailing norms, values, worldviews, and beliefs (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial decisions, legislation, or policy (ethical judgment)

Social Justice

  • Assess and compare the significance of people, places, events, or developments at particular times and places, and determine what is revealed about issues of social justice in the past and present (significance)
  • Ask questions and corroborate inferences about the content, origins, purposes, and context of multiple sources and multiple perspectives (evidence)
  • Compare and contrast continuities and changes for different groups and individuals at different times and places (continuity and change)
  • Determine and assess the long- and short-term causes and consequences, and the intended and unintended consequences, of an event, legislative and judicial decision, development, policy, and movement (cause and consequence)
  • Explain different perspectives on past and present people, places, issues, and events, and distinguish between worldviews of the past or present (perspective)
  • Recognize implicit and explicit ethical judgments in a variety of sources (ethical judgment)
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about controversial actions in the past or present after considering the context and standards of right and wrong (ethical judgment)

CONTENT

Students will know…

Social Studies 10

  • The development, structure, and function of Canadian and other political institutions, including First Peoples governance affect people’s sense of identity.

BC First Peoples 12

  • Role of oral tradition for BC First Peoples practices, and materials among local BC First Peoples and with non-indigenous peoples provincial and federal governmental policies and practices that have affected, and continue to affect, BC First Peoples responses to colonialism the resistance of BC First Peoples to colonialism
  • Role and significance of media in challenging and supporting the continuity of culture, language, and self-determination of BC First Peoples
  • Commonalities and differences between traditional and contemporary BC First Peoples governance systems
  • Contemporary challenges facing BC First Peoples, including legacies of colonialism

Comparative Cultures 12

  • Definitions of culture and how these have changed over time
  • Elements of culture and cultural expressions
  • Conflict and conflict resolution within and between cultures
  • Systems of power, authority, and governance
  • Role of value systems and belief systems in the development of cultures
  • Interactions and exchanges between cultures
  • Interactions between cultures and the natural environment

Contemporary Indigenous Studies

  • The varied identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples, and the importance of the interconnection of family, relationships, language, culture, and the land
  • Factors that sustain and challenge the identities and worldviews of indigenous peoples
  • The resilience and survival of indigenous peoples in the face of colonialism
  • Community development, partnerships, and control of economic opportunities
  • Responses to inequities in the relationships of indigenous peoples with governments in Canada and around the world
  • Restoring balance through truth, healing, and reconciliation in Canada and around the world

Comparative World Religions

  • Core beliefs, practices, and ethics of world religions, including spirituality in First Peoples cultures
  • Approaches to doctrines or belief systems
  • Institutional and social structures
  • Sacred texts, traditions, and narratives

Law Studies

  • The Constitution of Canada and the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • Legislation concerning First Peoples

Social Justice

  • Connections between self-identity and an individual’s relationship to others in society
  • Connections between social justice issues
  • Past and present social injustices in Canada and in the world, their possible causes, and their lasting impact on individuals, groups, and society

CORE COMPETENCIES

Which Core Competencies will be integrated into the unit? 

Positive Personal & Cultural Identity

  • Awareness, understanding, and appreciation of all the facets that contribute to a healthy sense of oneself. It includes awareness and understanding of one’s family background, heritage(s), language(s), beliefs, and perspectives in a pluralistic society.

Communication

  • Acquire, interpret, and present information (includes inquiries)

Critical Thinking

  • Analyze and critique
  • Question and investigate

The following resources are made available through the British Columbia Ministry of Education. For more information, please visit BC’s New Curriculum.

Big Ideas

The Big Ideas consist of generalizations and principles and the key concepts important in an area of learning. The Big Ideas represent what students will understand at the completion of the curriculum for their grade. They are intended to endure beyond a single grade and contribute to future understanding.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Core Competencies

orangecommunicationCommunications Competency

The set of abilities that students use to impart and exchange information, experiences and ideas, to explore the world around them, and to understand and effectively engage in the use of digital media

bluethinkingThinking Competency

The knowledge, skills and processes we associate with intellectual development

greensocialSocial Competency

The set of abilities that relate to students’ identity in the world, both as individuals and as members of their community and society


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Curricular Competencies & Content

Curricular Competencies are the skills, strategies, and processes that students develop over time. They reflect the “Do” in the Know-Do-Understand model of curriculum. The Curricular Competencies are built on the thinking, communicating, and personal and social competencies relevant to disciplines that make up an area of learning.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Additional Resources

First People's Principles of Learning

To read more about First People’s Principles of Learning, please click here.

For classroom resources, please visit the First Nations Education Steering Committee.