Unit Plan:
Storytelling, Cultural Identity and First Nations Culture

FSL / Grade 6-7

Big Ideas

Stories communicate ideas in a meaningful way.

Concepts:

  • Culture
  • Identity
  • Communication

Essential Questions

Students will keep considering…

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

Evaluative Criteria
  • Students will be evaluated by teacher using a rubric*
  • Students will be evaluated by their peers using a rubric*
  • Rubrics can be teacher generated, or generated together with students or can be a rubric that you use already for oral presentations.
  • Please see Learning plan for more details.
  • Teacher developed rubric for performance task including oral and cultural components.
  • Rubric: Create a rubric which evaluates both French oral language skills and the cultural message in the story.  Reflective process should also be used.

Monitoring Progress

Teacher will monitor progress:
Teachers can monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment including but not limited to:

N/A

Resources

WEBSITES

TEXTS

  • La Danse d’Anisha. (Les Echos de l’île de la Tortue)
  • C’est le temps de céléber ( Les Echos de l’île de la Tortue)
  •  “La famille, c’est special “ Echos 2 literacy book.

Reflection

How will teachers and their students reflect on and evaluate the completed project?

Teacher Reflection

  • What aspects of the unit went well?
  • What did students struggle with?
  • What did you struggle with?
  • What would you add/revise the next time you taught this unit?
  • Were there any unintended outcomes?
  • Were students engaged?

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

EXECUTE THE LEARNING PLAN

LEARNING EVENTS:

  • These learning events/activities are suggested activities only. 
  • In some cases the plans are not fully completed lesson plans. 
  • The teacher may choose some lessons/activities to span over several lessons. 
  • Teachers may add, revise and adapt these lessons based on the needs of their students, their personal preferences for resources, and the use of a variety of instructional techniques.

Learning events are enriched for students when teachers consider the “WHERE TO” acronym and guiding organizer by Wiggins and McTighe.

> Click here for more information on WHERETO

 

 

Where To

Where: Where are we going in this lesson Why? What is expected of my students during and after this lesson? • Present the performance task to students early in the unit • Post essential questions; students can generate their own questions as well • Check for  misconceptions
How: How will I hook and hold student interest during this lesson? • Use a provocation as an entry point • Present students with a mystery or challenge
Equip: How will I equip students for expected performances? How will I make sure to teach the foundational skills so that they can understand and complete tasks? • Access understandings and experience with solid instructional practices • Consider strategies that work for divers e learners • Incorporate literacy 44 strategies
Rethink and Revise: How will I help students reflect, rethink and revise their ideas, writing, and tasks? • Have students rethink the big idea • Have students reflect on  their learning  to build understanding
Evaluate: How will students self-evaluate and reflect on their learning after each lesson/task? Some ideas for self-evaluation include:

• Ticket out the door • Rubrics and checklists • Formative assessments and feedback

Tailor: How will I tailor learning to varied needs, interests and styles? (refer to the NVSD Adaptations Checklist). • Differentiate to your students with the product, the process and the content
Organize:   How will I organize and sequence the learning in each lesson and transition to a new lesson? • Start with the end in mind
Please note that the order in which teachers present this to their students is not mandated to the order of the acronym.

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

Lesson 1 - Why Do We Tell Stories?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

 

Why Do We Tell Stories? (Lesson 1)

1) Show students examples of unique and inspiring ways to tell stories (consider   you audience); song, dance, puppet shadow, books, oral history etc…(A) (M)

2) Ensure that brainstorming ideas are comprised as a “French Word Wall”  for future reference to high- frequency words used in this unit. (A)

3) Students should reflect on; favourite stories, stories they have never forgotten, why they love stories, their favourite way to listen to, read, view stories are. (M)

Formative Task: Students create a reflective document based on favourite story memory. (M)

Lesson 2 - What Is Culture? What Is Your Culture?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

 

What Is Culture? What Is Your Culture? (Lesson 2)

1) How do we define culture? Students will likely discuss; food, traditions, holidays, music, celebrations etc… (A)

2) Students will reflect on the culture of; their home, their school, sports teams, classrooms etc… (M) (T)

Lesson 3 - Reading of First Nations Story “La Danse D’Anisha”

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

 

Reading of First Nations Story “La Danse D’Anisha”  (Lesson 3)

1) Review reading strategies with students.  Use of cognates, images, familiar words, voice intonation and teacher gestures will help ensure comprehension of text. Images will help students with less French Fluency get the gist of the text. (A)

2) Use prediction activity to ensure students use the images as their first tool. (A)

3) Teacher guided reading of La Danse D’Anisha. Students should repeat and practice words that might be useful in their Performance task. (A)

Formative Task: Students will re-enact their favourite part of the story and their peers can guess the part.  A tableau format is useful for students with less French Fluency. (A)

4. Use vocabulary warm up games (charades etc…) at the beginning of subsequent lessons to ensure that students retain new vocabulary throughout the unit. (A)

Lesson 4 - Student Creation of Story that Explores an Aspect of Culture

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Why do we tell stories?
  • How does the way we tell a story reflect our cultural identity?

 

Student Creation of Story that Explores an Aspect of Culture (Lesson 4)

1) Students will choose between creating their own cultural story or choose to re-enact a story that they already know or is provided for them.  (This will depend on the level of French Fluency in your classroom.) (T)

2) Students should be encouraged to include previously acquired vocabulary in their skits, but also to use gesture and image to relay their messages. (A) (T)

3) Formative Task: students should reflect on their cultural message and ensure that it will be clear to their audience. My message is: ___________.  My audience will understand my message through____________________.

4) Students should reflect on their peers work in a reflective task that demonstrates how their cultural identity is explored through story. (T)

5) Summative Task: Teacher evaluation: rubric that focuses on both oral use of French language and clarity of cultural message and above all an understand  Teachers can include written high-frequency words as part of evaluation. Also, evaluation of the students reflective process. (T)

Peer evaluation: rubric that focuses on clarity of cultural message similar to above formative task. (T)

The following resources are made available through the British Columbia Ministry of Education. For more information, please visit BC’s New Curriculum.

 

Big Ideas

The Big Ideas consist of generalizations and principles and the key concepts important in an area of learning. The Big Ideas represent what students will understand at the completion of the curriculum for their grade. They are intended to endure beyond a single grade and contribute to future understanding.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Core Competencies

orangecommunicationCommunications Competency

The set of abilities that students use to impart and exchange information, experiences and ideas, to explore the world around them, and to understand and effectively engage in the use of digital media

bluethinkingThinking Competency

The knowledge, skills and processes we associate with intellectual development

greensocialSocial Competency

The set of abilities that relate to students’ identity in the world, both as individuals and as members of their community and society


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Curricular Competencies & Content

Curricular Competencies are the skills, strategies, and processes that students develop over time. They reflect the “Do” in the Know-Do-Understand model of curriculum. The Curricular Competencies are built on the thinking, communicating, and personal and social competencies relevant to disciplines that make up an area of learning.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Additional Resources

First People's Principles of Learning

To read more about First People’s Principles of Learning, please click here.

For classroom resources, please visit the First Nations Education Steering Committee.