Unit Plan: Fundamentals of Athletics and Fitness

Physical & Health Education / Grade 4-7

Big Ideas

Daily physical activity enables us to practice skillful movement and helps us develop personal fitness.

 

Concepts:

  • Fitness
  • Movement
Essential Questions

Students will keep considering…

  • What does it mean to be fit?

Evaluative Criteria

Teacher Evaluative Criteria:

> Fitness Log, with reflections before, during, and after exercise

> Fitness Log, with chart filled out accurately

> Movement rubric

> Communication rubric

 

Monitoring Progress

Teacher will monitor progress:

N/A

Potential Student Misunderstandings:

N/A

Reflection

How will teachers and their students reflect on and evaluate the completed project?

Teacher:
Next time I teach this unit I would…

 

Student:
My students needed:

Process:
Product:
Content:

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

EXECUTE THE LEARNING PLAN

LEARNING EVENTS:

  • These learning events/activities are suggested activities only. 
  • In some cases the plans are not fully completed lesson plans. 
  • The teacher may choose some lessons/activities to span over several lessons. 
  • Teachers may add, revise and adapt these lessons based on the needs of their students, their personal preferences for resources, and the use of a variety of instructional techniques.

Learning events are enriched for students when teachers consider the “WHERE TO” acronym and guiding organizer by Wiggins and McTighe.

> Click here for more information on WHERETO.

Where To

Where: Where are we going in this lesson Why? What is expected of my students during and after this lesson? • Present the performance task to students early in the unit • Post essential questions; students can generate their own questions as well • Check for  misconceptions
How: How will I hook and hold student interest during this lesson? • Use a provocation as an entry point • Present students with a mystery or challenge
Equip: How will I equip students for expected performances? How will I make sure to teach the foundational skills so that they can understand and complete tasks? • Access understandings and experience with solid instructional practices • Consider strategies that work for divers e learners • Incorporate literacy 44 strategies
Rethink and Revise: How will I help students reflect, rethink and revise their ideas, writing, and tasks? • Have students rethink the big idea • Have students reflect on  their learning  to build understanding
Evaluate: How will students self-evaluate and reflect on their learning after each lesson/task? Some ideas for self-evaluation include:

• Ticket out the door • Rubrics and checklists • Formative assessments and feedback

Tailor: How will I tailor learning to varied needs, interests and styles? (refer to the NVSD Adaptations Checklist). • Differentiate to your students with the product, the process and the content
Organize:   How will I organize and sequence the learning in each lesson and transition to a new lesson? • Start with the end in mind
Please note that the order in which teachers present this to their students is not mandated to the order of the acronym.

 

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

Lesson 1 - Fitness Concepts: What Does It Mean to Be Fit?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

 

Fitness Concepts: What Does It Mean to Be Fit? (Lesson 1)

Hook: show pictures of people in a variety of situations, with a variety of body shapes. Have students categorize the pictures into “fit” and “unfit.”‘

(A) Teacher will unpack the word “fit”, addressing some of the stereotypical bias that accompanies the word. Are skinny people fit? Are large people unfit? Challenge stereotypes with a picture of elite runner who is bulimic, or a large man who could be a champion shot putter (often, they don’t “look” fit). Essentially try to get to the point where students will not judge fitness based on physical appearance, as this is misleading. Consider all health components of fitness, explaining each one. Begin a word wall with these health components, ideally written by students.

(M) With an expanded concept of a “fit” person, have students describe a fit person in their life, other than themselves. Have them draw this person, and include aspects of his/her lifestyle that makes him/her fit, or create a mindmap about this person.

Lesson 2 - Fitness Concepts: Does It Matter How We Move?

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

Fitness Concepts: Does It Matter How We Move? (Lesson 2)

Hook: Show video clips of athletic performances, particularly those involving running, jumping and throwing.

(M) Have this essential question posted, and ask students to reflect upon this and then Think, Pair, Share. Have students discuss the various viewpoints, and draw in considerations of injury prevention, posture, efficiency for competition, aesthetic appreciation (dance), overall personal health, etc.

Discussion conclusion: Show a picture of “Mrs. Hunter” on her 100th birthday. She goes for a walk every day, and continues to live independently. Take away idea: sometimes it’s more important that we DO move, even if it’s not efficient / competitive.

(A) Teach the terms locomotor, non-locomotors and manipulative skills. Have students come up with as many examples of each to put around each definition. Add these terms to the word wall.

Lesson 3 - Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Throwing Technique

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

 

Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Throwing Technique (Lessons 3)

Teacher can review throwing technique and catching technique before teaching the lab. (See this video on YouTube: “Baseball Throwing Fundamental Drills”.) Have students set it up as a proper science lab, listing equipment, procedures, etc.

Depending on the experience of the child, this lesson will involve some (A), (M), and (T)

Have students in partners. One partner will stand on a line going across a field that has cones showing a distance of every 5m down the field. The second partner will stand behind and watch to “spot” where the ball lands on the ground after it has been thrown. Students will try throwing a softball, getting 3 tries for each throwing technique. After each throw, the partner will provide a measurement of how far the ball went, estimating the distance if it went between two cones.  Once one partner has tried a technique three times, they will switch roles. Distances thrown should be recorded on an observation table.

SAFETY NOTE: Teachers should have students all throw at once, and then call out “retrieve” so kids aren’t collecting balls while others are throwing.

Technique #1:
Throwers stand with both toes on the line, hips staying still and square on the line as well. Arm is raised, but must be still; only the wrist can be propelled to throw the ball. Some students will discover that they can throw it farther if they “flick” their wrist when throwing; this is good technique, and will help when combined with other movements.

Technique #2:
Throwers throw the softball, keeping their torso still, toes and hips square, but now they get to use their entire arm to swing. Try 3 throws and switch roles.

Technique #3:
Throwers throw, beginning the movement from their lower torso. Some students will figure out that it helps to twist the torso, bringing the arm back, and leading with the elbow.  They may also discover that it helps to counterbalance the work of the throwing arm with the non-throwing arm. Try 3 throws and switch roles.

Technique #4:
Before throwing, students should practice the footwork of this technique. First, students should stand two strides BACK from the throwing line, with toes pointing forward down the field. Then, the foot that is the same as the throwing arm pe. Right) will take a step, placing their foot PARALLEL to the throwing line. Then, the opposite foot and arm take a step, with both toes and fingers pointing at the intended target Students pretend to throw an imaginary ball, focusing on the WEIGHT TRANSFER and FOLLOW THROUGH actions. When they feel confident that they have mastered the technique without the ball, they should try throwing three times with a ball. Throws should be measured as accurately as possible.

Observations from the lab can be expressed in a chart, then bar graph. Students should generate conclusions based on their data, but also on the observations that they made about their throwing partner. Conclusions for the lab can focus on a creating a Tip Sheet for effective throwing, or a Coaches Corner type video.

 

Lesson 4 - Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Catching

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

 

Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Catching (Lesson 4)

Depending on the experience of the child, this lesson will involve some (A), (M), and (T)

This lab should occur after the throwing lab, and once students have a sense of how important it is to step forward during a throw to generate power. Once they have this understanding, it is easier to grasp the concept of stepping backward to facilitate catching. Just as stepping forward accelerates the throw, stepping back DECREASES the velocity of the throw, making the ball easier to catch.

SAFTEY NOTE: Use soft pink balls or bouncy rubber balls for this lab so if students fail to catch, they will not be hurt.

Have the students work with a different partner from the previous lab, and try the following catching techniques. Students should make anecdotal observations after each technique, and should see how far apart they can move and still successfully catch the ball while maintaining form.

Technique #1:
Arms and feet pointing toward thrower, elbows locked straight. Try to catch the ball without bending elbows or moving feet Record observations.

Technique #2:
All joints can move (flex/extend) as they try to catch the ball, but feet must remain in the same place. (This also reinforces throwing accuracy!)

Technique #3:
Arms begin out in front of body. As hands begin contact with the ball, catcher takes a step backward, “absorbing” the momentum of the ball.

Observations from the lab can be expressed using diagrams, measurements of how far apart the partners can be and still catch effectively while maintaining the prescribed technique.  Conclusions for the lab can focus on a creating a Tip Sheet for effective catching, or a Coaches Corner type video.

Lesson 5 - Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Running

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

 

Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Running (Lesson 5)

Depending on the experience of the child, this lesson will involve some (A), (M), and (T)

Have the students set up their Movement Lab, using the following as part of the materials necessary to complete the lab: a section of grass, a section of gravel path, a section of paved road (that is blocked from cars), running shoes.

In partners, students will use a particular running technique for about 50m each. Partners will record observations about their partners. The running technique will all be performed on grass or gravel path. Compare/contrast the effects of different types of terrain at the end of each lab in an anecdotal manner.

Technique #1:
Run 50m on grass keeping your arms pinned to your sides, (very awkward – no counterbalance).

Technique #2:
Run 50m taking strides as long as possible, and leading with the feet, (forward foot will break momentum – ineffective).

Technique #3:
Run 50m with arms moving in a north-south direction, staying bent at a 90 degree angle, with elbows driving back (not worrying about bringing arms up high in front – also -breaks momentum), and chest “up and out”.

Technique #4:
Run 50m with arms the same as in Technique #3, but now each leg pushes off and the knees drive “up and through”, and the foot touches down just in front of the body, or slightly underneath the body.

Lesson 6 - Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Jumping

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • What does it mean to be fit?

 

Fitness Concepts: Movement Lab for Jumping (Lesson 6)

Depending on the experience of the child, this lesson will involve some (A}, (M), and (T)

This movement lab will involve a series of stations, and may be broken up into multiple lessons.  Stations can be set up for students to try skipping, hopscotch, hurdles, standing broad jump into a sand pit (if available]. As students go from one station to another, they should record observations about themselves and a lab partner. Observations should address the following:

1. What body movements help initiate a two foot take-off jump? A one foot take-off?

2. What body movements help initiate a controlled stop to the jumping action? (Think: motorcycle stop.)

3. How can your body generate more height (power]?

4. How can music help your jumping technique?

5. What components of fitness are targeted by skipping?

Students can create reasoned hypotheses about each of these questions before the lab and after, and can make conclusions based on observations.

This lab offers an excellent interdisciplinary opportunity to learn limericks, songs, etc. that students can sing while skipping. They can even make their own lyrics to an established song; perhaps tailoring the lyrics to the class or school.

The following resources are made available through the British Columbia Ministry of Education. For more information, please visit BC’s New Curriculum.

 

Big Ideas

The Big Ideas consist of generalizations and principles and the key concepts important in an area of learning. The Big Ideas represent what students will understand at the completion of the curriculum for their grade. They are intended to endure beyond a single grade and contribute to future understanding.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Core Competencies

orangecommunicationCommunications Competency

The set of abilities that students use to impart and exchange information, experiences and ideas, to explore the world around them, and to understand and effectively engage in the use of digital media

bluethinkingThinking Competency

The knowledge, skills and processes we associate with intellectual development

greensocialSocial Competency

The set of abilities that relate to students’ identity in the world, both as individuals and as members of their community and society


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Curricular Competencies & Content

Curricular Competencies are the skills, strategies, and processes that students develop over time. They reflect the “Do” in the Know-Do-Understand model of curriculum. The Curricular Competencies are built on the thinking, communicating, and personal and social competencies relevant to disciplines that make up an area of learning.


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 Additional Resources

First People's Principles of Learning

To read more about First People’s Principles of Learning, please click here.

For classroom resources, please visit the First Nations Education Steering Committee.