Unit Plan: Fractions

Math / Grade 6-7

Big Ideas

Social Studies 10

  • Worldviews lead to different perspectives and ideas about developments in Canadian society.

BC First Peoples 12

  • The identities, worldviews, and language of BC First Peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through their connection to the land.
  • The impact of contact and colonialism continues to affect the political, social, and economic lives of BC First Peoples
  • Cultural expressions convey the richness, diversity, and resiliency of BC First Peoples.

Comparative Cultures 12

  • Understanding the diversity and complexity of cultural expressions in one culture enhances our understanding of other cultures.
  • Interactions between belief systems, social organization, and language influence artistic expressions of culture

Contemporary Indigenous Studies

  • The identities, worldviews, and language of indigenous peoples are renewed, sustained, and transformed through the connection to the land.
  • Indigenous peoples are reclaiming mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual well-being despite the continuing effects of colonialism.
  • Indigenous peoples continue to advocate and assert rights to self-determination.

Comparative World Religions

  • Comparing beliefs provides insights and understanding of diverse global cultures and peoples.

Law Studies

  • Understanding legal rights and responsibilities allows citizens to participate more fully in society.
  • Laws can maintain the status quo and can also be a force for change.
  • A society’s laws and legal framework affects many aspects of people’s daily lives.

Social Justice

  • Social justice issues are interconnected.
  • Individual worldviews shape and inform the understanding of social justice issues.
  • The causes of social injustice are complex and have lasting impacts on society

Concepts:

  • Personal Identity
  • The factors that determine identity either personally, community, or institutionally

Essential Questions

Students will keep considering…

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

Evaluative Criteria

N/A

Monitoring Progress

Teacher will monitor progress:
Teachers can monitor progress through ongoing formative assessment including but not limited to:

  • Class discussion
  • Group and pair discussions

Reflection

How will teachers and their students reflect on and evaluate the completed project?

Teacher Reflection

  • What aspects of the unit went well?
  • What did students struggle with?
  • What did you struggle with?
  • What would you add/revise the next time you taught this unit?
  • Were there any unintended outcomes?
  • Were students engaged?

Stage 3 – Learning Plan

EXECUTE THE LEARNING PLAN

LEARNING EVENTS:

  • These learning events/activities are suggested activities only. 
  • In some cases the plans are not fully completed lesson plans. 
  • The teacher may choose some lessons/activities to span over several lessons. 
  • Teachers may add, revise and adapt these lessons based on the needs of their students, their personal preferences for resources, and the use of a variety of instructional techniques.

Learning events are enriched for students when teachers consider the “WHERE TO” acronym and guiding organizer by Wiggins and McTighe.

> Click here for more information on WHERETO

<h2>Where To</h2>
<table style=”height: 1175px;” border=”2″ width=”813″ cellpadding=”8″>
<tbody>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>W</strong>here:</td>
<td width=”212″>Where are we going in this lesson Why? What is expected of my students during and after this lesson?</td>
<td width=”378″>• Present the performance task to students early in the unit • Post essential questions; students can generate their own questions as well • Check for  misconceptions</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>H</strong>ow:</td>
<td width=”212″>How will I hook and hold student interest during this lesson?</td>
<td width=”378″>• Use a provocation as an entry point • Present students with a mystery or challenge</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>E</strong>quip:</td>
<td width=”212″>How will I equip students for expected performances? How will I make sure to teach the foundational skills so that they can understand and complete tasks?</td>
<td width=”378″>• Access understandings and experience with solid instructional practices • Consider strategies that work for divers e learners • Incorporate literacy 44 strategies</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>R</strong>ethink and Revise:</td>
<td width=”212″>How will I help students reflect, rethink and revise their ideas, writing, and tasks?</td>
<td width=”378″>• Have students rethink the big idea • Have students reflect on  their learning  to build understanding</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>E</strong>valuate:</td>
<td width=”212″>How will students self-evaluate and reflect on their learning after each lesson/task?</td>
<td width=”378″>Some ideas for self-evaluation include:
<p style=”padding-left: 30px;”>• Ticket out the door • Rubrics and checklists • Formative assessments and feedback</p>
</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>T</strong>ailor:</td>
<td width=”212″>How will I tailor learning to varied needs, interests and styles? (refer to the NVSD Adaptations Checklist).</td>
<td width=”378″>• Differentiate to your students with the product, the process and the content</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=”67″><strong>O</strong>rganize: <strong> </strong></td>
<td width=”212″>How will I organize and sequence the learning in each lesson and transition to a new lesson?</td>
<td width=”378″>• Start with the end in mind</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td colspan=”3″ width=”657″>Please note that the order in which teachers present this to their students is not mandated to the order of the acronym.</td>
</tr>
</tbody>
</table>
<p style=”text-align: justify;”>

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

Lesson Hook

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

 

Lesson Hook

1) Write the following on the board and ask students what do they think it means? Not Inuk enough to be Inuk, not white enough to fit in.

2) Take their suggestions on how the statement impacts a person’s sense of self and identity.

3) What does this suggest about Kathleen’s identity and her ideas of being between two worlds? 

Lesson 1 - Introduction

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

 

Introduction (Lesson 1)

If you have not already introduced identity, start with discussion on identity such as the following.

1) Brainstorm with students on the board where does identity mean? Answers may include: who I am, who I see myself as, etc.

2) Then ask students to think about where does identity come from. Answers may include; my family, school, my traditions, culture, language, faith, community friends, sports teams, how we see ourselves.

Ask older students: Who has the most influence over your identity? Is this fluid and how does it change? When do our peers influence our identity more than our families? Who Decides Identity?

3) Ask students:

a. how does our identity connect us with our family, friends and community and why is it important?

b. Who decides our identity? How does connection with our community build and shape our identity?

c. Can organizations such as sports teams, choirs, schools shape our identity? Are these forms of community?

d. Should other people?

5) Review if you have already discussed what identity means and how we form our identity, review with students where identity comes from. Tell students that as a class will be looking at three examples of how identity can impact the individual, community and a larger community such as a country or many different people.

Lesson 2 - Part 1

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

 

Part 1 (Lesson 2)

1) Write the following on the board and ask students what do they think it means? ‘Not Inuk enough to be Inuk, not white enough to fit in’

2) Take their suggestions on how the statement impacts a person’s sense of self and identity. What does this suggest about Kathleen’s identity and her ideas of being between two worlds?

3) Introduce Kathleen Merritt, the Throat Singer who combines both Inuk an Irish ancestry into her music as a way of claiming her identity.

4) Play the video: ‘Not Inuk enough to be Inuk, not white enough to fit in‘. This musician is carving her own identity.

5) Either provide discussion questions as a handout or have students discuss in groups or as a whole class.

6) Understanding Throat Singing: Play the following video clips so that students have an understanding of Inuit/Inuk throat singing:

7) Play some of Kathleen’s music from her album. Play two examples of Kathleen’s music: “Sim’s jig” and “Tiqtivaluk (feat. Mamaqtuq).” How do the two examples illustrate the cultural influences in the music? Which community does Kathleen belong to? Who decided this? How does Kathleen create her identity through her music?

Lesson 3 - Part 2

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

 

Part 2 (Lesson 3)

1) Josiah: Individual to Community: Discuss/review that Kathleen reclaimed her identity through her music and that she incorporated both of her ancestries. She defined her own identity. What happens when a group/organization or others try to define your identity?

2) Hand out the article: “Status Indian player barred from All Native sports event.” 

3) Read the article to the class or read it aloud.

4) Go over the following with students: Status, non-status, racism, bloodline.

5) Show on a map where the Heiltsuk First Nation is located. Where was Josiah born? How did Josiah become a member of the Heiltsuk First Nation? Who gets to decide who is a member of the community? Is it the community or others?

6) Worldview and Perspective on Identity: Use attached discussion guide. Find evidence or quotes in the article that illustrate the Heiltsuk point of view on identity? How does this differ from others?

“We saw it as extremely insulting,” Josiah’s father, Dr. Don Wilson, told CBC News. “It’s upholding that abhorrent notion that blood quantum or DNA or birth is what defines us as indigenous people, and it absolutely is not.”

“Wilson says the Heiltsuk First Nation has a long-standing tradition of adoption that tournament organizers must acknowledge.”

“We do not make a distinction between our children,” said Wilson.

“They’re all ours. We as the Heiltsuk Nation accept my son as one of us.

7) Find a quote where Josiah shares his identity as a Heiltsuk member?

“I was kinda shocked,” said Wilson, 20. “It hurts. It hurts. I’ve been part of the Heiltsuk tribe. I’ve lived up in Bella Bella, I’ve played basketball with the team, engaged with the community. Now this All Native committee is telling me I’m not native at all. I’m like, ‘What?’ I’d say [it’s] racist.” I’m black, I’m from the Caribbean, but at the same time I’m part of the Heiltsuk Nation. I consider myself one of them.”

8) Ask students what should the outcome be? Take suggestions and ideas. Share with students that Josiah won his human rights case.

9) Discussion: Lead students in a discussion that in the first example Kathleen was creating her own identity. For Josiah he was accepted by his community and the Canadian government as being Indigenous. The All Native Basketball tournament was trying to define Josiah.

10) Discuss with students the differing worldviews on what it means to be accepted by the community. Share the article.  What does Josiah’s situation highlight about identity and who defines somebody?

11) After discussion regarding community and how indigenous communities claim people as part of the community, ask students, what happens when nobody claims you or you can’t say where you are from.

12) Explain to students that this has recently happened in Canada.

13) Go over the controversy regarding author Joseph Boyden

14) Who Claims You? Explain the Controversy regarding Joseph Boyden and his identity. Controversy: APTN writer wrote article suggesting that Boyden heritage is questionable. Relate this back to the discussion regarding Kathleen and Isiah and how the community accepted them and this follows Indigenous protocols. The controversy for Boyden is if a community claimed him.

15) Wab Kinew Video: Asks students what the statement Who Claims You Means? Relate it Boyden, Wilson and Merrit. Play the Wab Kinew Video.

16) After video ask students what does the video and the statement Who Claims You Means and to think about this for the next day.

Lesson 4 - Day 2

The Learning Events should always be prefaced by focusing on the essential questions:

  • Who defines a person’s identity, the individual, the community or institutions?

 

Part 4 (Lesson 2)

1) Review with class the ideas presented in Wab Kinew’s video.

2) What does the statement Who Claims You mean to them and to the Canadian Indigenous communities? How does this relate to Kathleen and Josiah’s cases?

3) Who is Boyden: Ask students whether they think Boyden is who he claims to be?

4) Take poll.

5) Read with class “Author Joseph Boyden’s shape-shifting Indigenous identity.”

6) Use graphic organizer Seeing Both Sides to place evidence that the author uses to question Boyden’s identity.

7) Read with class “My Name is Joseph Boyden” and fill out the other side of the Seeing Both Sides Graphic Organizer that supports Boyden’s point of view about his identity.

8) Take a new poll on whether students support Boyden or not.

9) Have students choose a partner and have them place their chairs facing each other. Number students partner 1 and 2. Have partner be in favor of Joseph Boyden. Partner 2 is against Joseph Boyden. Tell students partner 1 has three minutes to argue their case to their partner. Then partner 2 has three minutes to present their argument.

The following resources are made available through the British Columbia Ministry of Education. For more information, please visit BC’s New Curriculum.

 

Big Ideas

The Big Ideas consist of generalizations and principles and the key concepts important in an area of learning. The Big Ideas represent what students will understand at the completion of the curriculum for their grade. They are intended to endure beyond a single grade and contribute to future understanding.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Core Competencies

orangecommunicationCommunications Competency

The set of abilities that students use to impart and exchange information, experiences and ideas, to explore the world around them, and to understand and effectively engage in the use of digital media

bluethinkingThinking Competency

The knowledge, skills and processes we associate with intellectual development

greensocialSocial Competency

The set of abilities that relate to students’ identity in the world, both as individuals and as members of their community and society


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Curricular Competencies & Content

Curricular Competencies are the skills, strategies, and processes that students develop over time. They reflect the “Do” in the Know-Do-Understand model of curriculum. The Curricular Competencies are built on the thinking, communicating, and personal and social competencies relevant to disciplines that make up an area of learning.


Visit the Ministry of Education for more information

Additional Resources

First People's Principles of Learning

To read more about First People’s Principles of Learning, please click here.

For classroom resources, please visit the First Nations Education Steering Committee.